Monday, February 06, 2012

Ignoring the boundaries of decent journalism

This is page 1 of the April 2012 American Patchwork & Quilting. One of my most fabulous clients allerted me to this article over the weekend. This article is about her daughter, also a client of mine, and the 13 quilts she made in the 18 months leading up to her wedding. The quilts were part of her modern-day dowry, and they were beautifully displayed at her wedding reception. Maybe some of you caught this story as it unfolded several months ago. It is posted here.
So upon hearing of her story going in a magazine, I went right out on Satuday and found the magazine. The photos they showed are lovely. In fact, I quilted each of these shown in the magazine, and another seven of the thirteen. Want to see?...Ok, maybe not, but they are here anyways, and here, and here, and here, and here and here, and here, and here, and let's not forget the show quilt that earned a 3rd place. There are a few that obviously never made it into blog posts, but I have pictures of them on my computer. Just humor me, I need a little vent.

It has always been my understanding that journalists should be held to the utmost in standards. They shouln't be allowed to report half the story, because the readers might actually believe only the half they are saying. This lovely article makes absolutely NO mention to the person that actually made these lovely tops into quilts. Imagine my anger and horror. I am a professional that relies on referral of clients by what is published, or shown at quilt shows, or word of mouth. Quilt shows are not allowed to not make mention of the quilter. Otherwise they may as well be called Flimsy shows. I doubt that would catch on. I hate stirring up hornet nests, but I just had to send a message to the editor this morning. They manage to publish the quilter's name with every quilt pattern & photo that they include in their magazines. So why not here? If there was not a dedicated quilter behind the scenes, it may well have only been 12 quilts. One of these was quilted a week before the wedding, just hours before I left on vacation. I could have very easily said no, but I happily did not.

So, fellow quilters out there, let's unite. Tell the publications that this crap is unacceptable. I'm not looking for my 12 seconds in the limelight, just the appropriate credit for what has been done. The story is all her's. I just want small text beside the photo indicating that I quilted them. Simple.


15 comments:

shannon said...

as a quilt-for-pay LAer, i feel your pain!

my other pet peeve is shows dropping the 2person quilting category with the reasoning that a piecer could 'buy' a blue ribbon with who they choose to quilt their top....

i agree, the show committees need to realize that the number of the quilt hung in shows would drop significantly if it were for 2nd person quilters...

it chaps my backside to put it nicely.

Trudi said...

As a quilter I could understand the pride I would feel with an article that said I quilted all those quilts. Whilst it is not unheard of, many quilter DO make that many quilts in a year let alone 18 months, but credit where credit is due, whilst I have not read the article, I agree it is important that credit be given at a minimum next to the pictures to say pieced by... quilted by ... - surely? I love it when you rant! Makes me jump on my own little orange box! :)

Sewing Junkie said...

I did a TV spot for a sewing segment one time. It was editied and the whole thing said nothing that made any sense. So needless to say maybe her part of the article was edited. I would talk to the customer and ask what was said for the article and make a judgement call from there. Chris

Tami @ Lemon Tree Tales said...

Oh no, this isn't right. Especially since this is something that you do professionally as a living. It shouldn't have taken the magazine any time at all to verify who quilted the quilts. In the future they should probably make it de rigueur to ask who designed the quilt, who pieced it, and who quilted it. Then they can properly credit any and all involved in the making of that quilt. I hope the editors get back to you. Perhaps they should do an article about LA and feature you and some of the quilts that you have quilted.

bernie said...

That is really surprising that a well known quilting mag would totally ignore credit to the quilter. I haven't read the article, but can understand your feelings. Bernie

~Michelle~ said...

For some strange reason, I actually subscribe to this magazine (even though it's so not my style), and I saw that article. It didn't even give an indication that the quilting was done by anyone else. And as you say, that doesn't seem right. It really wouldn't be difficult to add a tiny "Quilted by..." recognition. You have to do that with show quilts, right? And I always credit the quilting when I don't do it. It's especially strange since the mother's post about the quilts specifically mention you, and that's how the magazine saw the story in the first place!

Ms. Jan said...

A quilt ain't a quilt until it's quilted. Piecing is only part of the story, as we all know. I agree that you should ask your client about the interview. It certainly would have been better had the magazine "featured" the professional who turned the tops into quilts. It's only fair!

Debbie said...

Didn't see the article but when I go to quilt shows I always look at who gets credit for the quilting...very important!

MariƩ said...

Is it not your client that wanted to create the impression that she completed all the quilts herself?

Razzle Dazzle Quilter said...

Hi
I can so relate to this. I have just had the same thing happen to me. I was gob smacked - to say the least!
Not fair!
Linda

Vivian said...

I'm really surprised that APQ wouldn't have credited you with the quilting if your client told them you did the quilting. Most magazines are really good about that these days.

But now that you've contacted them, I am sure they will print a correction in the next issue and on their website making the appropriate attribution. Heck, if they really want to make it up to you, they should have you and the client on Pat Sloan's radio show to talk about the whole project!

bingo~bonnie said...

WOW- unbelievable that a magazine would leave off such an important detail! I read that article about the bride to be competing so many quilts before her wedding day and was amazed with her accomplishment! and when I clicked on your blog I recognized the photo and was so pleased to read that you were the longarmer..... but so disappointed to read that they didn't mention you at all. Not only should they have listed your name under the photo but also your Mainely Quilts of Love website address!!!

I'm also interested in seeing what type of reply you get back from APQ!!

Love from Indiana! ~bonnie

Strlady said...

I just saw your post and I'm sorry that credit was not given in the magazine itself. As you know we ALWAYS give you credit. Your work makes our work shine. You also know that in my posts I not only mention you as the quilter but also link to your website.

With that said, during my interview, you were mentioned and the interviewer had me spell out your name and your location.
As you can see by the article they tried to capture alot in a small amount of space. I was surprised that a small notation like the one giving credit to the photographer was not added but I don't know enough about publishing and how layout is achieved to say anything.
I expected to see your credit appear in the link that was to carry the link to my blog post. I kept looking for it to appear but they would not activate the link until the "official" newstand publishing date which was around 2/5. I checked this morning and you are given credit on the blog post as the longarm quilter. The post also links to my post where you are all over the place with our gratitude for going the extra mile to get this project to the finish line.
I hope those that read your post will never think that we would in any way take credit away from you.

JessicaSews said...

I know I'm not alone when it comes to viewing a quilt; first you look at the pattern and fabric, then you go in for the close-up... the quilting design! I just wanted to stop by and compliment your quilting work (as seen in the latest issue of American Patchwork & Quilting)... it is beautiful... quite beautiful!

Texana said...

As a former quilter-for-hire, I totally agree that credit should be given the quilter as well as the quilt-top-maker...it is definitely a collaborative effort and we all know that "quilting makes the quilt"...or breaks it, as the case may be. That is why good quilters are in such demand.